Do you filter your tap water at home and use BPA-free bottles out and about? I refuse to pay for bottled water and am very anti-plastic (see my post 10 Easy Ways to Reduce Plastic Consumption) so we always use refillable drinking bottles, for their eco-friendliness and health benefits (always BPA free), including the sturdy One Green Bottle which we used for several years.

Refillable BPA-Free Drinking Bottle

We’ve recently tried the Lifestraw Play BPA-free filtering drinking bottle (children’s version of Lifestraw Go, created to make groundwater safe to drink in developing countries) and we love it.

Image of white box containing green plastic Lifestraw water bottle standing on grass with tree trunk behind

Long-life Water Filtering

Available in five colours (we like green best!) they are really sturdy, fun and eco-friendly. The only downside for me is that they are plastic but being BPA-free and reusable for years (the filter lasts 4,000 litres; around six years if used for 2l of water a day) they’re the next best thing to perfect.

Image of 5 plastic drinking bottles in different transparent colours

Fun for Kids

Lifestraw Play includes fun interchangeable discs in the cap for kids to swap as they choose. The discs are cardboard which I expected to ruin when washed but after nearly 6 weeks of use our owl is still going strong.

Image of purple drinking bottle cap on beige carpet with animal picture in centre and other circular animal pictures on floor

Taste Test

On comparing filtered Lifestraw Play water with tap water, the filtered water definitely tasted better; ‘cleaner’ and sweeter.

We also tested it in spring water in the Northumbrian hills where it performed excellently, filtering all sorts of mossy bits from the red, peaty water and tasting just as fresh as filtered tap water! Wild Mummy was honorary ‘Beefeater’ though, just in case it hadn’t worked.. (as with any groundwater, even if you’re filtering, think about what might be upstream – dead animals etc. Lifestraw doesn’t filter out viruses so try to use spring water where possible)

Check out the colour of that water..!

Micro-plastic Filtering

Even better for a plastic-free planet, Lifestraw recently tested for micro-plastics in various water sources. They found micro-plastic in 93% of bottled water and 83% of tap water. Lifestraw filters out all that micro-plastic, even from tap water. Wow!

Great for Kids Activities

Lifestraw Play is great for school, sports, travel, walking, camping and as we proved, filters groundwater brilliantly.

It needs washing and drying regularly and should be thoroughly dried before storing.

Caroline (aged 8) uses it everywhere including at Cubs, Forest School, kayaking, hillwalking, the beach, dancing and all day at home. It’s a little heavier than some bottles and can be hard to get the flow going but she loves how fresh the water tastes and I love everything about it – if Lifestraw develop a non-plastic bottle I’d become a shareholder!

Image of girl in blue jacket sat on rocks looking down with stream below and hills behind

Water for Developing Communities

Additionally the company has a fantastic ethical programme. For every single product purchased they provide a child in a developing country with clean drinking water for a whole year. Pretty impressive (and helps to justify the fairly high price).

Try a Lifestraw Play and let me know your thoughts below.

Pros

  • Sturdy
  • Fun exchangeable cap design
  • Great colours
  • BPA-free
  • Child-friendly 285ml (10oz) size
  • Removes 99.999999 % of bacteria, parasites & micro-plastics
  • Reduces organic chemical matter (pesticides, herbicides, VOCs)

Cons

  • Plastic
  • Hard to suck for younger children
  • If you’re really thirsty they’re too slow to get big gulps from!
  • Pricey but worth it for eco-credentials

Buy a Lifestraw Play

Click the image to buy from Amazon

NB Kids of the Wild received a Lifestraw Play for the purposes of this review. All views and observations are my own (and Caroline’s, aged 8).